Support SaysBrad
  • (Most Compact 20000mAh Portable Charger) Anker PowerCore 20100 - Ultra High Capacity Power Bank with Most Powerful 4.8A Output, PowerIQ Technology
    (Most Compact 20000mAh Portable Charger) Anker PowerCore 20100 - Ultra High Capacity Power Bank with Most Powerful 4.8A Output, PowerIQ Technology
    Anker

    This thing, you need. Run your smartphone for days.

  • Klear Screen iKlear Cleaning Kit for iPad, iPhone, Galaxy, LCD, Plasma TV, Computer Monitor and Keyboard (Cloth, Wipes and Spray)
    Klear Screen iKlear Cleaning Kit for iPad, iPhone, Galaxy, LCD, Plasma TV, Computer Monitor and Keyboard (Cloth, Wipes and Spray)
    Klear Screen

    I use this cleaner for my iPhone, iPad 3, iPad mini and MacBook Pro. It’s great all-around and won’t mess up the oleophobic coating on iOS device screens.

  • Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound 3.5 Grams
    Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound 3.5 Grams
    Artic Silver

    If you’re having problems with your Adonit Jot capacitive touch stylus or Hex3 Jaja, you can improve its performance and reliability with careful application of thermal paste! For more on this, check out my capacitive touch stylus how-to fix-it guide. Months later (Sep 2013), my styli are still performing great!

  • Adonit Jot Touch with Pixelpoint pressure sensitive stylus for iPad - Black
    Adonit Jot Touch with Pixelpoint pressure sensitive stylus for iPad - Black
    Adonit

    Adonit Jot with Pixelpoint, works with a lot of new drawing apps on iPad.

  • Klear Screen's iKlear 8 oz. Pump Spray Bottle 7351-IKHP, Others, Electronics & Computers
    Klear Screen's iKlear 8 oz. Pump Spray Bottle 7351-IKHP, Others, Electronics & Computers
    Klear Screen

    The stuff I use to keep my iPad screen nice and clean!

  • Cosmonaut: Wide-Grip Stylus for Capacitive Touch Screens
    Cosmonaut: Wide-Grip Stylus for Capacitive Touch Screens
    Studio Neat

    Awesome capacitive touch stylus created by Studio Neat. Great guys, great product. I use mine every day! Bradtastic Approved.

  • Adonit Jot Pro Stylus for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, and Other Touch Screens (ADJPG)
    Adonit Jot Pro Stylus for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, and Other Touch Screens (ADJPG)
    Adonit

    Adonit Jot Pro is an awesome capacitive touch stylus for iPad & other tablets.

  • Pencil by FiftyThree Digital Stylus for iPad Air, iPad Mini and iPad 3/4 - Walnut
    Pencil by FiftyThree Digital Stylus for iPad Air, iPad Mini and iPad 3/4 - Walnut
    FiftyThree

    Even if you consider yourself a casual doodler or note-taker, you’ll love this well designed stylus. Built for Paper by FiftyThree, the iPad app — however, many other apps support Pencil.

  • Bicycle Standard Index Playing Cards (Pack of 2)
    Bicycle Standard Index Playing Cards (Pack of 2)
    Sportsman Supply Inc.

    Playing Cards for your password creation or poker game!

My Amazon.com Wish List
If you’re looking for an app, need personal or corporate branding, marketing material, an illustration, logo, sketch or design — there’s a Brad for that!

Entries in typekit (3)

Friday
Jun032011

New fonts at Squarespace

Looks like I'll need to modify this site again—Squarespace released some new fonts. It's got something to do with Google Web Fonts, but the easier it is, the better for me. Looks like I can start putting together my design site!

Saturday
Jul102010

Why you shouldn't steal fonts.

Language, communication, and the beauty of words… in part, an introspective. Reader beware: the following may challenge your beliefs — prepare to throw out your incorrect assumptions.


Designed very quickly by Bradtastic Brad Chin on the iPad using Sketchbook Pro. Copyright © 2010 — don’t steal art… even bad stuff.

Typography represents language directly; it’s the art of setting type. Modern fonts are so convenient; even restricted to less than one dozen web fonts at the turn of the millenium, the average person could detect distinct differences between Times New Roman and Helvetica/Arial.

Fonts make words come alive.

Great text can sit on a page, dull and boring — distasteful even — and still have great power, meaning and purpose. The difference is, set properly, words on a page become more; attaining and almost ineffable quality, something similar to the magic that happens when a great script is given to an incredible actor.

Finding a font could be considered similar to finding an actor to play a part — the role remains even without a star. A stand-in could work just fine — laymen might not even notice. Art, however, demands more.

Writing as a tradition, a prime element of culture and history, even on a blog.

Reading The Cult of the Amateur changed my stance on blogs and blogging as a pastime for the masses. Publishing, due to its inherent cost, was limited before the computer revolution. Type was carefully set, text was proofread, words were carefully chosen and fonts were limited.

Our time now is one where free font making software can be downloaded by any amateur and a plethora of sub-par, incomplete and broken fonts can be purchased for next-to-nothing. Many fonts are given away — worse, many are stolen.

Piracy of any artistic endeavor diminishes our future. Artists need to make a living just like everyone else; when music is stolen, movies are torrented or fonts are downloaded and traded illegally, many creatives stop creating. The quality of art descends holistically. These damaging actions aren’t usually malicious or intentional, but the consequences remain.

Piracy, specifically of fonts. (too broad a subject in general)

The completion of a proper, complete, well-crafted OpenType font (the best format, in my opinion) is quite an achievement. It takes careful craftsmanship, refinement, testing, modification… and finally it can be published. It might take a typographer one year to create a single font set — the letters and ligatures themselves are art. Using the font without paying for it is akin to stealing an image and using it, or relabeling a piece of music to claim ownership over another’s music, lyrics, and voice. It’s disheartening to see stolen art used for commercial purposes, and it’s absolutely pitiful that so many people are unaware of it.

Most people believe that they have the right to earn a living, especially here in America or in other major nations, but the anonymity of the Internet makes it easy to take from others for personal gain.

For the beauty of it.

I hope that others take a moment to appreciate language and the written word, especially in this age of video and high-fidelity audio. Keyboards are replacing pens, but when are keyboards going to be replaced? Eventually, we’ll speak to our computers to issue commands — beyond that, our thoughts alone will carry out machine functions. I cherish the opportunities I have to enjoy the beauty of a printed page, and I hope devices such as the Kindle encourage others to keep print from becoming a thing of the past. I have handwritten journals that will likely survive intact longer than the hard-drives of my current computers — there’s something wonderful about that. In its essence, typography represents our history as we want to remember it and present it.

American newspapers generally use serif fonts — European publications tend toward sans-serif. This simple difference of type-style represents large cultural differences… so elegantly.

Proper punctuation, spelling and grammar shouldn’t be cast aside. Our keyboard shortcuts, slang and 140-character limit “tweets” are changing English in ways difficult to predict. These trends will spread to other languages, and communication will adjust — it will advance, or dissolve. Language should adapt and change, but personally, I like a language with rules and etiquette.

A simple way to support type.


First, make sure you buy your fonts legally.

Obviously, don’t steal fonts. There are many ways to buy fonts, on-and-offline, but not all sources are legal. Buy from reputable sources. If you find a font discounted more than 40% — beware. If you’re looking for some really great stuff, check out Linotype and Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Also, a favorite of mine, Adobe offers an amazing collection called Font Folio 11. [all Bradtastic Approved!]

Don’t let others use your fonts.

Basically, don’t let other people steal fonts. Most fonts aren’t “purchased” — they’re licensed — meaning the creator or foundry maintains rights over the font, and when you “buy” it, you’re buying the rights to use the font. The license agreement will likely specify what you can and can’t do with the font.

Spread the love.

Share this with others; hopefully there are people out there who like writing and reading, and enjoy nice-looking type. Explain why it’s important to respect the rights and work of the typographers and artists who spend so much effort, energy and money to create these wondrous letters, and tell them what the rules are.

There’s also a great, simple way to share new and amazing fonts online — Typekit. I won’t go into too much detail here — there’s an about page — basically, the type designers are paid, and Typekit code allows splendid, unique fonts to display on most major browsers as highlightable, regular text. The days of using images for fancy fonts are over; they’re even figuring out how to get this tech to work on mobile browsers like the iPad and iPhone. For an example of Typekit in action, check out Bradtastic Defined, my very personal site. I need to re-familiarize myself with coding first, but I’m planning on implementing Typekit fonts on all of my sites. 

 

Please, share your thoughts; comment, ask questions…

and definitely share your favorite fonts with me!

 

Thursday
May272010

Enhancing and beyond

First, I really wish TypePad or Squarespace would release an iPad-specific app for blogging — Squarespace’s web-UI only partially functions on the device (example: image uploading doesnt work in iPad Safari). I suppose I could use the iPhone app, but I’d lose the iPad’s improved keyboard.

I mention TypePad because, if they were to create a nice iPad app, I’d consider using them for my new Bradtastic site — and possibly suggest the Six Apart service as a new home for AIS. I want to utilize Typekit; at my new Bradtastic site, and possibly in the future, here.

I have a much better idea of what I’m going to write about and share. So much has happened over the past two-weeks; I’ve met amazing people, I’m working on amazing projects, and I’ve felt a bit better physically, too. I am somewhat saddened watching the French Open — I truly loved playing Tennis… I hope someday I’ll be physically able to again.

Bradtastic’s not so superfluous superfloo.us, and print work…

I’m working on some new designs and am carefully — lovingly — crafting a new feel for my “branding.” I do hope you enjoy it.

A glimpse of what’s coming.

iPad reviews, app reviews, my thoughts on Flash and web design, thoughts on typography and design… and most importantly, my 2010 — and what’s beyond.