Support SaysBrad
  • (Most Compact 20000mAh Portable Charger) Anker PowerCore 20100 - Ultra High Capacity Power Bank with Most Powerful 4.8A Output, PowerIQ Technology
    (Most Compact 20000mAh Portable Charger) Anker PowerCore 20100 - Ultra High Capacity Power Bank with Most Powerful 4.8A Output, PowerIQ Technology
    Anker

    This thing, you need. Run your smartphone for days.

  • Klear Screen iKlear Cleaning Kit for iPad, iPhone, Galaxy, LCD, Plasma TV, Computer Monitor and Keyboard (Cloth, Wipes and Spray)
    Klear Screen iKlear Cleaning Kit for iPad, iPhone, Galaxy, LCD, Plasma TV, Computer Monitor and Keyboard (Cloth, Wipes and Spray)
    Klear Screen

    I use this cleaner for my iPhone, iPad 3, iPad mini and MacBook Pro. It’s great all-around and won’t mess up the oleophobic coating on iOS device screens.

  • Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound 3.5 Grams
    Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound 3.5 Grams
    Artic Silver

    If you’re having problems with your Adonit Jot capacitive touch stylus or Hex3 Jaja, you can improve its performance and reliability with careful application of thermal paste! For more on this, check out my capacitive touch stylus how-to fix-it guide. Months later (Sep 2013), my styli are still performing great!

  • Adonit Jot Touch with Pixelpoint pressure sensitive stylus for iPad - Black
    Adonit Jot Touch with Pixelpoint pressure sensitive stylus for iPad - Black
    Adonit

    Adonit Jot with Pixelpoint, works with a lot of new drawing apps on iPad.

  • Klear Screen's iKlear 8 oz. Pump Spray Bottle 7351-IKHP, Others, Electronics & Computers
    Klear Screen's iKlear 8 oz. Pump Spray Bottle 7351-IKHP, Others, Electronics & Computers
    Klear Screen

    The stuff I use to keep my iPad screen nice and clean!

  • Cosmonaut: Wide-Grip Stylus for Capacitive Touch Screens
    Cosmonaut: Wide-Grip Stylus for Capacitive Touch Screens
    Studio Neat

    Awesome capacitive touch stylus created by Studio Neat. Great guys, great product. I use mine every day! Bradtastic Approved.

  • Adonit Jot Pro Stylus for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, and Other Touch Screens (ADJPG)
    Adonit Jot Pro Stylus for iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch, and Other Touch Screens (ADJPG)
    Adonit

    Adonit Jot Pro is an awesome capacitive touch stylus for iPad & other tablets.

  • Pencil by FiftyThree Digital Stylus for iPad Air, iPad Mini and iPad 3/4 - Walnut
    Pencil by FiftyThree Digital Stylus for iPad Air, iPad Mini and iPad 3/4 - Walnut
    FiftyThree

    Even if you consider yourself a casual doodler or note-taker, you’ll love this well designed stylus. Built for Paper by FiftyThree, the iPad app — however, many other apps support Pencil.

  • Bicycle Standard Index Playing Cards (Pack of 2)
    Bicycle Standard Index Playing Cards (Pack of 2)
    Sportsman Supply Inc.

    Playing Cards for your password creation or poker game!

My Amazon.com Wish List
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Friday
Apr222011

Blogging: as a technology and lifestyle

Blogging is definitely changing.

I’m not sure that writing blog entries has ever been as fun as it was when I actively maintained a LiveJournal. It’s so easy to get addicted to the comments, the attention, and that feeling of complex social integration. It was a one-stop news source and social radar; with friends-view and community journals, all kinds of information could be found and all questions could be answered without ever leaving LJ. [The quality of information is debatable, however.]

There, I felt connected to a ragtag group of mainstreamers, social misfits and outcasts, all chiming in from time to time — mostly to share random tidbits of useless nothingness, melodramatic rants and complex status updates in far excess of 140 characters.

It’s clear that old-school blogging has been replaced by Tumblr and Twitter.

People that used to maintain blogs like my old LJ now have these newfangled things — I’m not an exception; I have Antipresto (a tumblog) and a Twitter (@bradtastic). I’m not sure that it’s any more or less fun per se, but it seems easier. These sites require less formatting, less order; they are far more tolerant of chaos and are more conducive to quickness. This is enhanced by the accompanying mobile apps on my iPhone. [Note: I don’t use Android, so I can’t comment on its utilities and software. Nothing personal.] I can quickly peruse Twitter, reply to some friends’ questions or comments, and get answers of my own. At Tumblr, I get to see some cool photography and artwork, and I can easily share it with my friends.

[Also: I’ve recently begun playing around with Instagram, and I’ve been looking at Posterous again because they’d sent me an email, notifying me that somehow, perhaps by magic, their service has been improved. I also don’t know how good or bad it was before; when someone says “it’s better now,” I check it out. Sometimes.]

This has me wondering, “what’s left for personal blogs?”

Obviously, businesses can use blogging to update their customers and add personality to their (sometimes dull) corporate identities. There are a TON of news sites; they use blog technology to broadcast, syndicate, and inform — irregardless of the importance (measurable significance) of the information. I guess if there’s an audience for it…

Personal blogging seems somewhat silly now; after reading The Cult of the Amateur’ by Andrew Keen, I had to stop and assess what I was doing — with blogging. It wasn’t a particularly well-written book, but it raised some good points. Particularly as an artist, it made me question the quality of my content — it caused me to stop blogging altogether for quite a while.

[Much like how the movie Super-Size Me caused me to quit junk food cold-turkey for months upon months… it’s worth adding though, that I eventually had fast food again, and was kind of okay with that.]

The word blogger is often used as a pejorative; meaning “unpaid, amateur writer” or emo attention-seeker. There are a lot of accomplished authors, journalists and whatever-kind-of-writers whom happen to blog, but generally, they aren’t called “bloggers.”

I’d like to share more of my writing. I enjoy writing, communicating and teaching (and thereby, learning), so I want to “blog” — because the platforms, the technology, makes it easier. However, anticipating what kind of content (of mine) people want to read is often a challenge for me. I used to use the number of comments I’d receive as an indicator of quality (worked at LJ… sort of); having not received many here was discouraging, until I actually looked at my site’s stats, the number of unique visitors (non-bot), talked to readers, and found out that most of them just don’t like commenting.

I’d certainly like to receive comments — I’d like to be able to start new threaded dialogues and respond to thoughts about whatever it is I’m sharing; but I can’t expect them to just appear, especially as I post so sporadically.

Complications.

My interests are wide-spread and varied. I don’t like everything, but I find most things interesting. I have opinions — often strong ones — about pretty much everything as well… meaning, I have a lot that I could write about, but a lot of it will likely bore, well, anyone reading this.

Sometimes I feel like writing about video games, software, politics, playing cards, magic, relationships, religion, movies, Hollywood, board games, TV dramas, items from Pawn Stars that Rick is wrong about, food, music… and then there’s the more obscure, niche stuff. Like airplanes, warfare, military technology, Pygmy goats, cityscapes, my family…

My old LJ used to get tons of comments, because, frankly — I’d been friended by dozens of girls who found me attractive and wanted attention. At the time, I could write about anything and they’d respond. On occasion, I would post terrible artwork, just to see how many people would give me a positive review. (It was staggering, exhilarating, and… sickening.)

I am glad that I stopped blogging there, but there are some things that I miss. The friends-view, for one. Threaded comments were cool, and the communities there were (are) fervent.

So I end up with this dilemma; though it really has nothing to do with LiveJournal — do I post everything at one blog, or split up my interests into separate blogs?

I used to have an inkblog… it even won an award. I’d handwrite posts about nothingness on my Tablet PC, and upload the writing as an image, followed by a text “transcript” (completely un-automated), to a Media Temple-hosted WordPress blog. Now, I’m using that domain (bradchin.com) to share insights and stories about disabilities… at least, that’s the plan.

Fortunately and finally, there are some good writing apps for iPad. I’ll have an iPad 2 soon (within days, hopefully), and there are some adequate blogging apps — ones stable enough to dare relying on occasionally. Unfortunately, SAY: Media hasn’t released an iPad-native TypePad blogging app. However, I have made a point to start using my iMac and MacBook Pro (2007) more, and I’m going to take advantage of those tools to create more art (including writing).

[I also found some cool games to play: check out Torchlight for $15, Gratuitous Space Battles for $17, and Anomaly: Warzone Earth for $10. Anomaly will also be published on iPhone/iPad by Chillingo, hopefully soon!]

I feel old now, and I think it’s time to release the floodgates.

I used to hoard every morsel of creativity and ingenuity, now I see no reason in that. Perhaps by sharing this stuff, I’ll inspire someone else to do something cool, and in-turn, be inspired and reinvigorated myself. Plus, I think if I start creating more, I’ll be able to justify the cost of a new iMac (or Mac Pro, maybe) and MacBook Air.

Hopefully I can start a chain-reaction; pack up the place, move out of PBT and get a 3DTV. And I’ll have my blog to thank for that!

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